Correctional

Correctional

Content categorized as 'Correctional' is limited in scope to the US Correctional Industry. It does not include cross-industry topics that affect multiple United States industries or areas of study and does not reach internationally.

An estimated 3,890,400 adults were under community supervision at yearend 2020, which was a 6.6% decline from the 4,167,100 who were supervised in the community on January 1, 2020. This decline was solely driven by a reduction in people on probation, who made up the majority (79%) of the community supervision population. During 2020, the number of people on probation decreased from 3,330,200 to 3,053,700 (down 8.3%), the largest annual decline since the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) began the probation collection in 1980. The number of adults on parole increased 1.3% during 2020, from 851,000 on January 1, 2020 to 862,100 at yearend. Among all adult U.S. residents, 1 in 66 were supervised in the community at yearend 2020.

The Judicial Roundtables, convened on June 16 and July 9, 2020, explored how court operations have changed in the participating jurisdictions as a result of COVID-19, the impact of those changes thus far, and the potential long-term impacts of these short-term changes.

The Pretrial Executives Roundtables, convened on June 19 and July 16, 2020, explored how pretrial practices have changed in the participating jurisdictions as a result of COVID-19, the impact of those changes thus far, and the potential long-term impacts of these short-term changes

Key points of this brief:
• The use of sanction grids or matrices to respond to client behavior has not been shown to have a
significant impact on recidivism outcomes. There are no evaluations of grids/matrices that include
both sanctions and incentives.
• The use of sanction grids/matrices are associated with better uses of agency resources and reduced
use of jail or prison sanctions.
• There is strong evidence that the use of incentives by supervising officers produces improved
supervision outcomes for individuals convicted of more serious offenses and people classified as
higher risk to reoffend.
• Implementation challenges can interfere with the effectiveness of structured sanction and incentive
policies.

This report provides criminal justice policymakers and practitioners with a priority agenda to prepare the nation’s criminal justice system for future public health crises. Through its recommendations, the Commission seeks to better balance the roles and responsibilities of the public health and public safety fields.

In March 2020, at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic in the United States, The Marshall Project began to track how many people contracted COVID-19 in federal and state prisons across the country. For more than a year, working with The Associated Press, the numbers were updated every week. Download the raw data on Github and Data.world, and read more about other sources for current data and how they collected their numbers.

Two new studies show that jails can contribute enormously to coronavirus case totals outside their walls. While COVID-19’s spread inside the facilities has been widely reported, the research demonstrates just how great an impact it can have in communities outside.

The site offers analysis and resources to better understand how coronavirus is impacting people who are incarcerated. The COVID Prison Project tracks data from all 50 US states, Puerto Rico, the Federal Bureau of Prisons, and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

One in every five state and federal prisoners in the United States has tested positive for the coronavirus, a rate more than four times as high as the general population. This article examines data collected by The Marshall Project and The Associated Press.

Prisons and jails frequently suffer from overcrowding. Even in the best of times they are, by definition, facilities where people are placed in close contact with each other on a near-constant basis. This article examines ways correctional administrators can improve outcomes for those held in facilities during the COVID-19 pandemic.